Bottled Water: Are We Really Getting What We’re Paying For?

If you’re reading this, chances are you know that plastic water bottles are a major contributor to our escalating global plastic-pollution crisis. What you might not know is that there’s no health-based reason to be buying it.

Six plastic bottles filled with spring drinking water

In a recent installment of the Scientific American podcast “House Call Doctor,” Dr. Sanaz Majd recalled wondering why hospital personnel recommended avoiding bottled water and using tap instead when preparing supplemental formula for her prematurely-born twins. Upon researching the question, she found they were right: Not only is most bottled water no better for human health than tap water, but in many cases it’s actually worse.

“Sure, bottled water may potentially taste better than tap,” says Majd — “but that doesn’t mean it’s safer. If you are looking for safety, your kitchen sink is a better bet.”

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Bottled water may potentially taste better than tap, but that doesn’t mean it’s safer. Subject to less-stringent oversight by government agencies than tap water, bottled is more likely to nurture bacteria and other contaminants as it sits on store shelves. Some retail water bottles still contain BPA, an endocrine-disrupting chemical, and manufacturers are not required to divulge the water’s source on labels. All in all, it’s a bum deal for those who believe they’re getting something special for their hard-earned dollars — or at least is safer than what they can find at home.

See more at http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/health-fitness/healthy-eating/know-your-nutrients/should-you-drink-tap-or-bottled-water#sthash.MpTzCExm.dpuf.

To listen to the podcast, go to scientificamerican.com/article/should-you-drink-tap-or-bottled-water/.

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