Free Ebook Download: Sleep Safe in a Toxic World

Whether you’re interested in a cleaner environment or improved health for you and your family, Sleep Safe in a Toxic World by Lifekind® co-founder Walt Bader is essential reading for a good night’s sleep. Learn why beds are one of the single most overlooked causes of chemical exposure. Download your FREE copy today:
Sleep Safe in a Toxic World - Walter Bader
Click to download a free copy of Sleep Safe in a Toxic World: Your guide to identifying and removing hidden toxins from your bedroom

 

Are there federal requirements for calling a mattress “organic”?

Answer: Yes. And verifying these requirements is the only way to make sure you’re not falling victim to fraudulent advertising claims when shopping for an organic mattress.

The government agency that controls use of the word “organic” is the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), under Title XXI of the 1990 Farm Bill, otherwise known as The Organic Foods Production Act of 1990.

This Act established national standards governing the marketing of certain agricultural products as organically produced products in order to assure consumers that organically produced products meet a consistent standard and to facilitate fairness within interstate commerce.

USDA control over use of the word “organic” extends to non-edible agricultural crops such as cotton and rubber trees, and further extends to non-edible products derived from livestock, such as wool.

To call any of these raw materials “organic,” each producer must meet the requirements listed in the Act and subject its facility and products to annual audit by a USDA-approved “certifying agent.”

Furthermore, for a complex finished textile product, such as a mattress, to be called organic it must be composed of a minimum of 95% certified raw materials as listed above. Then independently, the company manufacturing the mattress must also meet the requirements as listed in the Act and to subject its facility and finished products to an independent annual textile audit to standards such as GOTS, by a USDA-approved certifying agent.

Therefore, to call a mattress “organic” or to sell it as such, the company producing the mattress must earn independent organic status and be awarded an organic certificate annually in their name. This means that a mattress cannot be called organic simply because it is made up of one, some, or even all organic raw materials. It is the “certifying agent” that substantiates that the organic claim being made is actually true. It must be a USDA-approved certifying agent, who through an audit process can give a company legitimate claim or right to use the term “organic.”

Legislation in the United States established the Federal Trade Commission Act in1914. Under this Act, the Commission is empowered to, among other things, prevent unfair methods of competition and unfair or deceptive consumer acts or representations affecting commerce.

If a company calls its product “organic” and its facility, methods, and specific products have not been awarded organic status by a USDA-approved certifying agent, that claim is deceptive, and constitutes an unfair method of competition in the marketplace. Unfair marketing claims fall under the purview of the FTC.

Specific to environmental claims, the FTC has published the “Green Guide.” While the guide defines a number of environmental terms and correct use and association of logos and seals, the primary emphasis of the document is substantiation. Environmental marketing claims must be substantiated.

Section 5 of the FTC Act prohibits deceptive acts and practices in or affecting commerce. A representation, omission, or practice is deceptive if it is likely to mislead consumers acting reasonably under the circumstances and is material to consumers’ decisions. See FTC Policy Statement on Deception, 103 FTC 174 (1983). To determine if an advertisement is deceptive, marketers must identify all express and implied claims that the advertisement reasonably conveys. Marketers must ensure that all reasonable interpretations of their claims are truthful, not misleading, and supported by a reasonable basis before they make the claims. See FTC Policy Statement Regarding Advertising Substantiation, 104 FTC 839 (1984).

In the context of environmental marketing claims, a reasonable basis often requires competent and reliable scientific evidence. Such evidence consists of tests, analyses, research, or studies that have been conducted and evaluated in an objective manner by qualified persons and are generally accepted in the profession to yield accurate and reliable results. Such evidence should be sufficient in quality and quantity based on standards generally accepted in the relevant scientific fields, when considered in light of the entire body of relevant and reliable scientific evidence, to substantiate that each of the marketing claims is true.

James Kohm is the Associate Director for the Enforcement Division of the Federal Trade Commission’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. In that capacity, he oversees enforcement of all consumer protection orders and the Commission’s Green Marketing program. When Mr. Kohm spoke on January 27, 2013 at the World Market Center, he made clear that the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) does not define what is or can be called organic. The FTC can conduct investigations relating to the organization, business, practices, and management of entities engaged in commerce and seek monetary redress and other relief for conduct injurious to consumers and other businesses from unsubstantiated environmental claims. Review the following links that report FTC investigation of unsubstantiated claims:

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2013/07/three-companies-barred-advertising-mattresses-free-volatile

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2011/01/ftc-settlement-ends-tested-green-certifications-were-neither

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2009/08/ftc-charges-companies-bamboo-zling-consumers-false-product-claims

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2014/01/ftc-approves-final-orders-settling-charges-three-companies-made

https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2014/06/ftc-brings-second-case-year-against-plastic-lumber-products?utm_source=govdelivery

 

At Lifekind, we’ve worked hard to establish and maintain a comprehensive organic program. This ensures the creation and assurance of certified organic goods. Testing, quality assurance, lot tracking, purchasing organic raw materials (despite the higher cost), and spending thousands annually on auditing are just a few of the ways in which we keep our rigorous organic program in place. Third-party certification is the only thing protecting us from companies that do none of these things, but would try nevertheless to reap marketing dollars by fraudulently associating the term “organic” with their products.

It does not fall to the consumer or retailer to judge what is or is not organic. For a company to call its products “organic” it must have been granted organic status by a USDA-approved “certifying agent.” The consumer need only confirm a valid certificate with the company’s name and products listed, not a certification showing he name of a grower or producer. At Lifekind, we’ve covered all the bases, so you can “rest” assured you’re purchasing a TRULY organic mattress.

8 Misleading Claims about Organic Mattresses – Is Your Mattress Certified Organic?

Misleading-Claims-Number-Graphics

Misleading Claim #1: Merchants using organic logos, or statements that use the word “organic,” to describe their mattresses as “organic” or partially “organic.”
Incorrect Because: Under USDA National Organic Program regulations (USDA/NOP), there are no such categories. There is only “certified organic.”

Misleading Claim #2: Merchants claiming that since they use the same organic materials that are used in certified organic mattresses, why pay more?
Incorrect Because: Without submitting to an independent third-party audit, a consumer has no assurance that whatever organic component is claimed to be used was actually used in making a mattress.

Misleading Claim #3: Merchants claiming that since the materials they use are the same as those used by true organic manufacturers, what’s the difference?
Incorrect Because: Fast food and fine dining can include the same ingredients, but the outcomes are quite different—it’s about quality and purity, not just materials.

Misleading Claim #4: Merchants using someone else’s certification to infer it is their own, but somehow doesn’t have their name on it for a string of reasons.
Incorrect Because: USDA certification certificates are not transferable.

Misleading Claim #5: Merchants claiming their mattresses are “chemical free.”
Incorrect Because: This is scientifically impossible.

Misleading Claim #6: Merchants claiming their mattresses are “nontoxic.”
Incorrect Because: This is also scientifically impossible.

Misleading Claim #7: Merchants claiming their mattresses are “free of volatile organic compounds (VOCS)” or have no harmful outgassing.
Incorrect Because: This is also scientifically impossible, and without an independentUL/GREENGUARD™ or similar test for finished-product emissions, no one can possibly know exact outgassing levels.

Misleading Claim #8: Merchants claiming that their components have been tested for the presence of a long list of chemicals and that none were found.
Incorrect Because: What this means is that the mattress components may have been tested at one point, early in the process, by what is known as a “presence” test. True, these chemicals may not have been present at that time, but it gives absolutely no information as to what is actually emitting from the finished mattress. That is a consumer assurance UL/GREENGUARD™ testing provides.

Find out if a mattress is in fact listed on the certifier’s website.

Note: The name of the manufacturer or retailer must be entered precisely, such as “Organic Mattresses, Inc.”

http://www.global-standard.org/public-database/search.html

http://certification.controlunion.com/certified_companies_and_products.aspx

 

FraudAlertGraphic

Our Top 10 Spring Cleaning Tips and Tricks

Spring is here, which means it’s time for spring cleaning!  OK, I know that you aren’t as excited about that as I seem to be, but hopefully these tips and tricks will help you when you are getting your house in tip-top shape this spring.

1. Put an organic bed-bug and dust-mite barrier cover on all of your pillows and on your mattress.  Even though natural rubber mattresses naturally repel dust mites (it’s not a very hospitable environment for the little buggers), these covers can also keep the surfaces of your bedding clean, and can be thrown in the wash very easily.  If you have an older innerspring mattress, a dust-mite barrier cover can keep the dust mites away from you.  If you already have covers on your mattress and pillow, this is the time to throw them in the wash.

WaterMarkDustMiteCover

 

2.  Freshen up your non-washable bedding by airing it out in the sun.  Wait for a nice sunny day, and put your wool comforter, pillows, couch cushions, and anything else that can’t go in the washing machine out in a sunny part of your yard.  You can even sprinkle a little bit of baking soda on the surface while it sits out in the sun for extra freshness.  The sun is a natural brightener, and will make your bedding feel nice and refreshed.

Baking Soda

3.  Instead of using your dryer to dry your bedding, hang it outside to dry.  Not only will it give you that great straight-off-the-line crispness, it doesn’t cost anything, and is a great way to save on energy costs when you are washing all of your bedding.

Fresh Organic Bedding

4.  Is your house feeling a little stuffy after being closed up for the winter?  Open all of the windows on a nice day, and let it air out.  It makes a huge difference in switching your mind from “winter mode” to “spring mode,” and makes the chore of cleaning a little bit more enjoyable.  If your house is especially stuffy, try one of our HEPA air purifiers.  Lifekind has several different sizes that can handle an area as small as your car to a space as large as 1,300 square feet!

 Lifekind HEPA Air Filter

 

5.  Dust all of your surfaces, starting at the top of the room, and work your way down to the floor, saving vacuuming for last. Don’t forget to wipe down your light fixtures and baseboards to remove contaminants that aggravate allergies.

6.  Vacuum after you have done the rest of the cleaning. If you vacuum first, you will just end up knocking all of the dust from higher up in the room back onto the floor, and you will need to do the floors again.  Save yourself a step.

7.  For hard, water-safe surfaces throughout your house, you can use our All-Purpose Cleaner and Degreaser.  It is made with grapefruit-seed and orange-peel extract, and has a nice, clean scent, so your house will smell great, without smelling like chemicals.  I usually dilute it for wiping down counters, painted walls and other light-duty cleaning, but also use it full strength for tougher cleaning.AllPurposeKO8.  Flip your mattress!  Most of our mattresses need to be flipped only once a year, and this is the perfect time to do it.  If you have a mattress that doesn’t need to be flipped, you can still rotate it (move the head of the mattress to the foot) so that it wears evenly and will last as long as possible.

Lifekind Organic Kids Mattress
9.  Move all of your appliances and clean out from behind them, including vacuuming off the dust from the back of the fridge, getting the schmutz from around the stove (full-strength Cleaner and Degreaser works great for this!), and all of the lint that hides around your dryer.  These hidden allergens can be annoying your sinuses, even if the rest of your house is spic-and-span clean.

10.  Put a few vases of fresh flowers around your house. Even though this isn’t really cleaning, it is a great way to put a smile on your face and remind yourself that spring is just around the corner after a long, cold winter!shutterstock_73432741
Bonus Tip: Don’t forget to change your household air filter.  You should be doing this every month to make sure your HVAC system is working as well as possible, but if you haven’t done it in awhile, do it now!

How to Dress a Bed Organically

Lifekind Organic Bedding

Bed dressing is an art form that has been passed down from ancient times – some of the first evidence of bed-like structures is found in South Africa and dates back to about 77,000 B.C. Over the centuries bedding materials have ranged from straw and hides to velvet and woven gold, but the main purpose has remained the same: comfort. Here at Lifekind we get lots of calls from customers who want to know what kind of bedding they should get and why.

Proper bed dressing is important because not only can it improve the overall feeling of the bed, it can also extend the life of your mattress. The picture below shows the ideal bedding configuration. Since it usually works best to start at the bottom and work your way up, we will start with the underbed pad.

Lifekind Organic Mattress Layers

The purpose of the underbed pad is to keep your mattress in good shape so that it can continue to provide you with the best possible sleep for years to come. A thick wool pad is an ideal way to protect the underside of your mattress from rubbing against wood bed slats or exposed metal hardware. Furthermore, a wool underbed pad will protect the underside of your mattress from dust build-up and can even help prevent mold and mildew from forming on parts of the mattress that get less airflow (wool is naturally dust-mite resistant and has the ability to wick away excess moisture).

If a wool pad offers protection for the bottom of your mattress, it only makes sense that wool would protect the top, too! Many mattress pads are made of synthetic materials, which may prevent spills from leaking onto your mattress, but can also prevent your mattress and your skin from breathing. We believe a wool moisture protector pad is the best way to start dressing the side of the bed you actually sleep on. This pad is meant to protect both you and your mattress – wool wicks away excess moisture from your skin (guarding against overheating and skin irritation) and at the same time creates a water-resistant barrier between you and the mattress (preventing mold, mildew, stains, etc.).

Next comes the flannel mattress pad. Many people are somewhat confused by the concept of needing both a moisture barrier and an all-purpose mattress pad (I know I was when I first heard of it), but with time I have come to realize that these two are like my favorite Jack Johnson song – it’s always better when they’re together. While a wool moisture pad provides a perfect water-resistant barrier, a flannel mattress pad acts as a sponge and gives pesky spills a place to go, rather than leaking into the mattress. The mattress pad is also one of those accessories that can change the feel of your mattress – either for better or for worse. We recommend a loose-fitting pad that is made from natural fibers (cotton flannel is awesome). These two rules of thumb will ensure that the pad is breathable and that it does not make your mattress feel taught (the “trampoline” effect).

The next layers – and possibly the most important ones of all – are the sheets. The reason why sheets are so important is that they are usually closest to your skin. Keeping in mind the fact that most people spend roughly one-third of their lives in bed, it is important to choose sheets that are free of dyes, chemicals and synthetics. Organic cotton is our best suggestion because it fits this standard of purity while also boasting breathability and washability! Dust mites feed on skin cells (and our entire epidermis is replaced within a period of about 48 days), so keeping your sheets clean is the key to protecting your entire bed from these icky invaders.

Lifekind Organic Egyptian Cotton Blanket

When it comes to blankets, layers are the key! By choosing breathable materials and doubling (or even tripling) up, you get a cozy bed that can easily be adjusted with changing weather. Comforters are prime suspects when it comes to finding synthetic fillings and chemical additives in your bedding. Wool offers a much safer and more comfortable alternative with its natural flame resistance and temperature regulation. Top it off with an organic cotton duvet cover and – voila! You’ve got a bed that’s “dressed to the nines.”

How do you tell when you need a new pillow?

We all have a favorite pillow on our bed that we love and gravitate toward. Mine has a special pillow cover, so I know exactly which one it is. It started out so nice and tall, and slowly, over time, became as flat as a pancake without my even realizing how much it was changing.

It got me thinking: How do we really know whether a pillow is right for us or when it’s time to replace it?

Here are some questions that can help you determine when it’s time to replace that beloved pillow. A “Yes” answer to any question is a good indicator it may be time to move on:

Is your pillow misshapen or lumpy?

Place it on a flat surface. Rather than laying flat,  do you notice lumps or a misshapen surface?

Does your pillow fail the “force test”?

For latex pillows, place your hand in the center of the pillow and push down. Is there sufficient resistance, or does your hand go all the way down to the surface underneath?

For down pillows, fold them in half and then let them go. Natural-down pillows should slowly regain their shape, while synthetic down should spring back quickly. If they don’t, it may be time to move on.

Do you ache when you wake up in the morning?

Did you buy your pillow more than 24 months ago?

Do you wake frequently to readjust your pillow or change your head’s position?

Having an inadequate or uncomfortable pillow can cause pain and prevent a restful night’s sleep. If your neck or back hurt, it may mean your pillow isn’t properly supporting your neck throughout the night.  If you wake up periodically to readjust your head, it’s also reducing the amount of rest you’re getting. Without good, deep sleep, it can be harder to function throughout the day.

Discovery News posted an article explaining why pillows become heavier as they age: “With just two years of use, one-third of a pillow’s weight is comprised of dead skin cells, bugs, and dust mites and their droppings.”  (For more information on what may be inside your pillow, visit Discovery News at http://news.discovery.com/human/pillow-insides-110627.html.)

I found that my pillow was in need of replacement, so I made sure to get a healthful and comfortable one from Lifekind. I chose the Wool-Wrapped Shredded Rubber Pillow, along with an Organic Cotton Pillow Barrier Cover.  Now I sleep peacefully through the night, and I love my new favorite pillow. I’m also glad to have the barrier cover so I don’t have to worry about it getting dingy or being full of things I’d rather not mention or even think about.

If you’ve determined that you need to replace your favorite pillow, give us a call or visit  www.lifekind.com so we can help you find a new one!


Next Week: How to select your perfect pillow