How Long Will It Last?

Recently a customer called to ask how long the sheets in our Organic Cotton Sateen Bedding Collection should be expected to last. It got me thinking about the lifespan of different products we sell, as well as how they show their age as the years go by.

towel

The organic cotton and wool we use isn’t mixed with polyester or other petrochemicals to artificially strengthen the fibers, nor are our towel collections treated with a coating of beef tallow and/or chemicals to make them feel softer and more appealing on store shelves. This results in a purer product, as well as one that will actually become softer than artifically-treated products over time. It also means that their lifespans aren’t artificially prolonged based on chemical content, however. For that reason, the possibility exists that they may experience a shorter life than artificially enhanced items – although I have to say that I’ve never experienced it personally in the 10 years I’ve been using our products. Our customers appreciate this, for the most part, knowing it’s part of the sacrifice we sometimes make in order to use natural products and to live lives as free as possible from exposure to hazardous chemicals.

Based on that, here’s an estimate of the expected average life of a few of our more popular products when cared for as recommended:

 

clockFlannel Pad:  Five years

Wool Moisture-Protector Pad:  Five years

Sheets and duvet covers:  Five years

Pillows:
Wool or cotton:  Five years
Natural rubber:  Ten years
Buckwheat:  Five years

Comforters:  Five years

Pillow tops:
Wool:  Five years
Natural rubber:  Ten years plus

Towels and bath mats:  Five years

Keep in mind that these are not warranty timelines, but basic averages that can be directly affected by the amount of usage and quality of care. Items that are washable can also be affected by water quality and temperature, detergents, and the use of fabric softeners. Pillows and fitted sheets tend to wear out most quickly, since they bear most of a sleeper’s concentrated weight. Sheets and pillowcases may develop thin spots that are more susceptible to tearing, and cotton and wool pillows will compact substantially as they’re used — wool pillows by about one-third and cotton pillows by about one-half. It doesn’t indicate that the product is defective, but rather that it’s been working hard and slowing down a bit as time goes by, as do people.

If you  have a question about how a Lifekind product is holding up over time, feel free to give us a call here on the sales team at 800-284-4983, or click on the “Chat with a live product specialist now!” link on our home page. We’re here to help.

Is Your Organic Mattress Too Soft or Too Firm?

Did you know…

…that what you add to the top of your bed can make a difference in how firm it feels? Sure, a super-soft, fluffy 3″ Wooly pillowtop will add softness to a mattress, but what about mattress pads, fitted sheets, and barrier covers?

The truth is, when a mattress is constrained by tight-fitting bedding, it can feel considerably firmer and have a more “hemmed in” feel. When a mattress is in its “undressed” state it’s able to expand in every direction, the way it would have when it was first designed by the manufacturer. The difference in how it can feel after bedding is added can be startling.

To mitigate this effect, our popular Flannel Pad and Wool Moisture Protector Pad are held onto your mattress with elastic straps on the four corners, instead of being a fitted product. (Fitted pads, which go all the way around and down the sides of the mattress like a fitted sheet, can affect the feel even more, and should be avoided if you want to keep the firmness as-is.)  Also, deep-pocket fitted sheets will provide more room for a mattress to expand than a tighter-fitting one will, so keep that in mind when choosing.

Finally, if you have a mattress you’d like to make a bit firmer, try using a tighter-fitting fitted sheet or fitted mattress pad. It might just make a difference!

8-24-toohardtoosoft

Sleep for Detoxification

Moderation is my default setting. I’m always looking for that comfort zone: Love the heat and sun but must find shade; happy in the winter snow with enough gear to keep me warm; I eat whatever I feel like but not too much (mostly organic of course). This pattern has kept me happy as a clam and moderately healthy for years.

 

Sometimes I wonder if I might need to step it up and, you know, DETOX. It’s spring, no better time, right? I would do it if I had to… eat raw foods only or fresh juice for weeks, but that’s just not my thing. Remember this is me – medium me. If you enjoy a good spring cleanse all the more green power to you!!

Spring-Detox

 

Recently, I was listening to a health issues show on our local non-profit radio and the guest was a naturopathic practitioner who was answering callers’ questions. One question was, “what is a good detox diet?” Imagine my relief when she replied that she doesn’t recommend regular detox programs to people who are otherwise healthy. In fact good sleep was her remedy as our bodies go to work detoxifying at night, naturally. I’m thinking… sleep… I can do that. Not a problem.
detox rox

 

That got me to thinking about my quality of sleep, which is now a priority to address with my newly found resources here at Lifekind. Here’s my realistic, long-term detox plan:

  • Replace chemical bedding (automatically less toxins).
  • Continue to sleep 7-9 full hours each night.
  • Go to bed by 10:00 more often (according to Ayurvedic wisdom, an hour of sleep before midnight is equal to two hours after midnight. Also, the phase intended for detoxification is between 10pm and 2am.)

 

Here’s to your health!

 

slumberer