How do you tell when you need a new pillow?

We all have a favorite pillow on our bed that we love and gravitate toward. Mine has a special pillow cover, so I know exactly which one it is. It started out so nice and tall, and slowly, over time, became as flat as a pancake without my even realizing how much it was changing.

It got me thinking: How do we really know whether a pillow is right for us or when it’s time to replace it?

Here are some questions that can help you determine when it’s time to replace that beloved pillow. A “Yes” answer to any question is a good indicator it may be time to move on:

Is your pillow misshapen or lumpy?

Place it on a flat surface. Rather than laying flat,  do you notice lumps or a misshapen surface?

Does your pillow fail the “force test”?

For latex pillows, place your hand in the center of the pillow and push down. Is there sufficient resistance, or does your hand go all the way down to the surface underneath?

For down pillows, fold them in half and then let them go. Natural-down pillows should slowly regain their shape, while synthetic down should spring back quickly. If they don’t, it may be time to move on.

Do you ache when you wake up in the morning?

Did you buy your pillow more than 24 months ago?

Do you wake frequently to readjust your pillow or change your head’s position?

Having an inadequate or uncomfortable pillow can cause pain and prevent a restful night’s sleep. If your neck or back hurt, it may mean your pillow isn’t properly supporting your neck throughout the night.  If you wake up periodically to readjust your head, it’s also reducing the amount of rest you’re getting. Without good, deep sleep, it can be harder to function throughout the day.

Discovery News posted an article explaining why pillows become heavier as they age: “With just two years of use, one-third of a pillow’s weight is comprised of dead skin cells, bugs, and dust mites and their droppings.”  (For more information on what may be inside your pillow, visit Discovery News at http://news.discovery.com/human/pillow-insides-110627.html.)

I found that my pillow was in need of replacement, so I made sure to get a healthful and comfortable one from Lifekind. I chose the Wool-Wrapped Shredded Rubber Pillow, along with an Organic Cotton Pillow Barrier Cover.  Now I sleep peacefully through the night, and I love my new favorite pillow. I’m also glad to have the barrier cover so I don’t have to worry about it getting dingy or being full of things I’d rather not mention or even think about.

If you’ve determined that you need to replace your favorite pillow, give us a call or visit  www.lifekind.com so we can help you find a new one!


Next Week: How to select your perfect pillow

RUBBER TREES ARE NOT BOUNCY

Rubber trees are not bouncy. I know; I was disappointed to find this out as well. As a child growing up on the philosophies of Dr. Seuss, I assumed that rubber trees grew in giant, jungle gym forests just outside of Whoville. They don’t, for the record, and if you ever find yourself in a rubber tree forest, trying to bounce from tree to tree is not advisable.

Rubber_Tree_proof

Rubber trees actually grow on large plantations, mostly in warm, tropical climates in countries like Malaysia and South Africa. Natural rubber is a sap, and is tapped from the tree much like maple syrup. It’s very sustainable; one tree can be tapped for 40 years without harming the growth of the tree. As a person who always casts her vote for sustainability, I am obviously all for this type of production, and loving the fact that natural rubber is rising rapidly in demand. As a person who works in an industry dependent on natural rubber, I am not so thrilled to find that demand is rising faster than production. This combination always seems to end in price increases.

With more demand from other industries looking for a natural alternative to synthetic rubber in their products, natural rubber is the “it-girl” of the latex industry. Factor in rising demand from rapidly developing countries such as China, and natural rubber is becoming more and more sought after. Unfortunately, unlike synthetic substances, we have to wait years for a rubber tree to mature before it is able to produce sap that can be used to make products.

And so this story ends with higher mattress prices. The cost of natural rubber went up 20% in just the past year, and unfortunately we can’t absorb that much of a price increase and still stay in business, although we wish we could. However, when put into perspective, a Lifekind organic mattress will last at least 20 years…which is 7,305 nights (including leap years)…which is 58,440 hours of restful, organic sleep. That’s a lot of sleep for your buck.

27_0603